Elections

General Election - 8 June 2017

There will be a General Election on 8 June 2017.

Official notices

Notice of Election

Statement of Persons Nominated (incorporating Notice of Poll and Situation of Polling Stations)

Notice of Election Agents

Key deadlines

Register to vote: Monday, 22 May 2017 - now closed

Applications to vote by post: 5pm, Tuesday, 23 May 2017 - now closed

Applications to vote by proxy: 5pm, Wednesday, 31 May 2017 - now closed

Are you polling day ready?

  • Polling stations are open 7am to 10pm.
  • To vote, you just need to put one ‘X’ in one box on your ballot paper.
  • You can find who is standing for election in your area by entering your postcode on Electoral Commission's website.
  • You don’t need to take your poll card with you when you go to vote, though it can make things quicker at your polling station.
  • If you’ve misplaced your poll card, you can find out where to go to vote by entering your postcode on our homepage.
  • Assistance is available tomorrow at polling stations for those who require it.
  • Postal ballot papers can be handed in at polling stations within your electoral area tomorrow until 10pm.

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Registering to vote

In order to vote in any forthcoming elections, you need to be on the electoral register.

Please telephone Electoral Services 01483 755855 if you are unsure whether you are registered; they are able to advise you of the registration process if you are not on the register.

Alternatively, you can now register online by visiting www.gov.uk/register-to-vote. Please note that the deadline to register to vote in an election is 12 working days before election day.

If you would prefer to vote by post in any forthcoming election, please download and complete an application to vote by post and return it to the address on the form. Once your postal vote has been allowed, the ballot papers will be sent to you in the fortnight before the election.

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Voting by post

If you would prefer to vote by post in any forthcoming election, please download and complete an application to vote by post and return it to the address on the form. Once your postal vote has been allowed, the ballot papers will be sent to you in the fortnight before the election.

The deadline to register for a postal vote is 11 working days prior to an election. Further information on voting by post is available.

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Voting by proxy

Electors can nominate another person (a proxy) to vote on their behalf, if they are unable to vote on election day. Please download and complete an application form to appoint a proxy for this election and return it to the address on the form. Once this has been allowed, your proxy will receive instructions about polling day. Please note a proxy application will only apply to one election.

In some circumstances, such as long-term sickness or regular employment abroad, electors are able to apply for a permanent proxy vote and have their application attested by a medical practitioner or employer.

Further information on voting by proxy is available.

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Polling station opening times

Polling stations will be open from 7am to 10pm.

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Who will be at the polling station?

The polling station staff ensure that voters are able to cast their vote in secret, free from influence and in a calm atmosphere.

Presiding Officer

The Presiding Officer is responsible for the conduct of the ballot in polling stations. Their main responsibilities are:

  • to open and close the polling station on time;
  • to account and be responsible for all the ballot papers, paperwork and ballot boxes;
  • ensure the requirements for secrecy and security are observed;
  • provide assistance to voters, where appropriate;
  • ensure the proper procedure for voting is followed; and
  • deal with candidates, agents and tellers and ensure they do not interfere with the voting process.

Poll Clerks

The Presiding Officer is assisted by one or two Poll Clerks. The main responsibilities of Poll Clerks are:

  • to check that voters are eligible to vote at the election and at that specific polling station;
  • check and mark voters' numbers on the electoral register; and
  • to assist with any polling station duties as requested by the Presiding Officer.

The law also specifies that other certain people may be present in polling stations (in addition to polling staff, voters and police officers).

These are:

Candidates

Candidates have the right to enter and remain in a polling station, but they must not disrupt voting or attempt to canvass voters.

Election Agents

Election agents have the right to enter and remain in a polling station, but they must not disrupt voting or attempt to canvass voters.

Polling Agents

All registered parties and individual candidates contesting the election may appoint polling agents. They have the right to enter and remain in the polling station and to observe voting.

Not more than one polling agent may be admitted at the same time to a polling station on behalf of the same registered party or any individual candidate.

Polling agents are not allowed to interfere with the voting process and must not campaign nor canvass voters in the polling station.

Tellers

Registered parties and individual candidates may ask their supporters to act as polling station tellers. Tellers stand outside the polling station to try and obtain the details of electors who have voted.

Tellers have no legal status and are not allowed to enter the room where voting takes place (other than to cast their own vote).

Tellers normally sit in an anteroom or corridor, as long as they do not block the route for voters. There should be one teller per party per polling place.

Electoral Commission guidance states:

Tellers must:

  • always remain outside the polling station
  • only enter the polling station to cast their own vote, to vote as a proxy or to assist a voter with disabilities

Tellers must not:

  • be able to see or hear what is going on in the polling station
  • impede, obstruct or intimidate voters on their way in or out of the polling station
  • demand any information relating to a voter's elector number, name or address
  • ask voters to re-enter the polling station to ascertain their elector number
  • have discussions with voters that may give rise to allegations of undue influence (e.g. voting intentions, party affliations or campaigns)
  • display any campaign material in support of or against any particular party or candidate other than a rosette.

Tellers may:

  • display a coloured rosette or badge displaying the name of the candidate or political party; the rosette/badge should not bear a slogan and must not be oversized.

Arrangements agreed locally:

Tellers may:

  • approach voters for information as they leave the polling station.

The Presiding Officer will check on the tellers' activities from time to time and make sure that they do not block the entrance or hinder voters from entering the polling station.

For further information, please contact Woking Borough Council on 01483 755855 or email elections@woking.gov.uk

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Could you be a councillor?

Are you passionate about Woking and working with local people in your area? Would you like to make a difference to the quality of life in your local area?

Then why not be a councillor?

Becoming a councillor is both a rewarding and privileged form of public service. You will be in a position to make a difference to the quality of other people's daily lives and prospects. Being an effective councillor requires both commitment and hard work.

Nominations have now closed for the elections on 4 May. Woking Borough Council is hosting a 'Could you be a Councillor' event on Saturday 10 June for anyone interested in standing for election.

For more information please contact Electoral Services on 01483 755855 or email elections@woking.gov.uk.