Neighbourhoods

Woking Borough has nine neighbourhood areas. These pages give a snapshot of each neighbourhood's history and current amenities.

To find out more, visit Your Neighbourhood on Window on Woking, where you can find detailed information about local services, facilities and organisations.

Just visiting? Take a look here for places to stay, eat and visit.

Byfleet, West Byfleet and Pyrford

Byfleet has a long and rich history that stretches back to the Doomsday Book, which can be researched in Byfleet Library. Byfleet and New Haw railway station is just outside the main village.

West Byfleet village has the second largest retail and commercial centre in the Borough, its own railway station, health centre and library. London Waterloo is just 40 minutes away by rail.

St. Nicholas' Church in Pyrford dates from the 12th Century. It is set in a circular churchyard near a prehistoric standing stone. Picturesque spots nearby include Pyrford Common and the Lock on the Wey Navigation. The ruined 12th Century Newark Priory lies just to the south.

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Goldsworth Park

Goldsworth Park was developed on the site of the former Goldsworth Nursery and is one of the largest residential estates in the UK. The majority of homes there have been built during the last 30 years and are centred around its recreational lake and shopping facilities.

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Horsell

Horsell Common is enjoyed by local residents and visitors for walking, riding and picnicking. The village's parish church is one of the oldest surviving buildings in the Borough.

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Knaphill and Brookwood

In the early 1790s, the Waterer family started the Knaphill Nursery. As well as playing a major part in the local economy by the end of the 19th Century, they had also produced their own original flower - the hardy Azalea was named the Knap Hill Hybrid.

Brookwood is the home of the famous Cemetery, and has its own railway station. On the North side of the Basingstoke Canal is the expanse of Sheets Heath.

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Maybury

Maybury comprises Victorian and Edwardian properties, including the former home of author H. G. Wells, who lived here whilst writing War of the Worlds.

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Mount Hermon, St Johns, Hook Heath and Mayford

Mayford is home to the Wyevale Garden Centre - formerly Jackman's Nursery - now one of the area's biggest garden centres and where the Clematis Jackmanii gets its name from. Nearby Prey Heath and Smarts Heath are ideal for a stroll.

Site of the first British crematorium, built in 1879 - six years before cremation was legalised. St. John's Lye is a scenic open space next to the Basingstoke Canal.

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Old Woking, Kingfield and Westfield

Old Woking is the original settlement in this area and was the site of Woking Palace, home of Henry VIII, which was abandoned in the 1620's. Grade I listed St. Peter's Church has one of only five picture doors in England, a 17th Century gallery, a 14th Century east window, a Jacobean pulpit and a collection of post Black Death Penn tiles.

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Sheerwater and Woodham

Sheerwater and Woodham are two distinct areas, separated by the Basingstoke Canal.

Sheerwater estate was built following the second world war, and houses over 1300 families. Woodham has more established homes and is purely residential.

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Woking Town Centre

The town centre has seen huge development since the 1960's and, more recently, during the 1990's, when the Peacocks Shopping Centre was built. This shopping and entertainment complex houses many high street stores over four floors, and the theatre and cinemas of The Ambassadors.

Some of the original buildings remain in the High Street and Chertsey Road areas of the town centre, near the busy railway station, where the majority of the town centre's restaurants and pubs can be found.

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